Fennell, Letts and Wilson, Mental Health Tribunals (Law Society 2013):
Foreword | Review | Amazon | Law Society bookshop | 20% discount

Email updates | Email discussion list | Twitter
CPD scheme (12 points for £60)



Main Page

From Mental Health Law Online

Revision as of 21:24, 9 April 2012 by Jonathan (Talk | contribs)
Jump to: navigation, search

The internet resource on mental health law in England & Wales, primarily for mental health practitioners, to which anyone can contribute. From April 2006 to September 2010 this website was called Wiki Mental Health. The following are the main content areas:


1. Case law   2. Legislation   3. General information   4. CPD scheme
Regularly updated commentaries on the cases, with links to the full text judgments on Bailii. (Currently 1521 categorised cases)   The full text of, and a simple and up-to-date commentary on, the Mental Health Act 1983, the Mental Capacity Act 2005, and related legislation.   General articles to explain the concepts and terminology used in the caselaw and legislation sections; and practical guidance for lawyers   Online CPD scheme providing 12 points for £60: suitable for solicitors (SRA-accredited), barristers (established practitioners), psychiatrists, social workers and psychiatric nurses.


Recent updates on website

For further details of the updates below, click here:

  • 22/07/14 (4): Criminal appeal. R (M) v Kingston Crown Court (2014) MHLO 50 (DC) — M had admitted to GBH but the Crown wanted to pursue GBH with intent, and the judge made an order under s35 (remand for report) to gather evidence about intent. (1) The purpose of an order under s35 was to inform the court of a defendant’s fitness to plead and his diagnosis, not to advance one party’s claim. (2) The judge’s misinterpretation of s35 was a jurisdictional error so the High Court was entitled (despite the limitation in s29(3) Senior Courts Act 1981) to quash the order made under it.

  • 22/07/14 (3): Ministry of Justice, 'MAPPA guidance' (version 4, 2012). Link to this guidance added. See MAPPA

  • 22/07/14 (2): Transfer procedure. R (L) v West London MH NHS Trust (2014) EWCA Civ 47, (2014) MHLO 49 — (1) There was no challenge to the first instance judge's finding that the common law duty of procedural fairness applies to decisions to transfer from medium to high security. (2) However, the judge had gone beyond what fairness requires, by requiring an overly-adversarial procedure. (3) Relief should not have been given on the facts of L's case, including because he had been able to put across his side of a disputed incident and had ceased objecting to transfer. (4) The ability of the decision-making process to achieve fairness has an undesirable element of fortuity. The decision-making process should therefore be "amended so that, absent urgency, a clinical reason precluding such notification, or some other reason such as the exposure of other patients or staff to the risk of harm, the 'gists' of the letter of reference to the high security hospital by the hospital that wishes to transfer the patient and the assessment by the clinician from the high security hospital are provided to the patient and/or his representative, and that the patient be afforded an opportunity to make written submissions to the panel."

  • 22/07/14 (1): Northern Irish case. MH v MHRT for NI (2014) NIQB 87, (2014) MHLO 48 — The patient challenged the MHRT's decision on the grounds that "(i) the approach of the MHRT was unlawful and that the MHRT had not adopted the narrow focused based approach required under Article 77(1) and Article 2(4) of the Order and, (ii) the MHRT had misunderstood the meaning of "discharge" and had failed to take into account the applicant's stated intention which was to remain in hospital as a voluntary patient if discharged from detention". These challenges were rejected. The tribunal's decision was the only reasonable one on the evidence.

  • 19/07/14 (3): Guardian, 'Murderer not entitled to remain anonymous while seeking rehabilitation' (Press Association, 16/7/14). A restricted transferred prisoner patient in medium security judicially reviewed the Secretary of State's refusal to grant permission for unescorted community leave. Cranston J refused to make an anonymity order, a decision upheld by the Court of Appeal (Lord Dyson MR; Maurice Kay LJ, VP; Floyd LJ). It is understood that an appeal will be made to the Supreme Court. See Forthcoming judgments#Re X (anonymity)

Keeping up to date

Receive updates via any of the following means:

Books
The Small Places: recent posts
Bailii: recent COP cases
Google: MH News