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National Policing Improvement Agency

The NPIA is a non-departmental public body which, among other things, develops guidance on behalf of the Association of Chief Police Officers. The ACPO is a private limited company. Recent guidance, published on 27/5/10, is entitled "Guidance on Responding to People with Mental Ill Health or Learning Disabilities 2010". The associated briefing notes are on (1) Recognising Mental Ill Health and Learning Disabilities, (2) Establishing Multi-Agency Protocols for Responding to Mental Ill Health and Learning Disabilities, (3) Providing Assistance with Pre-Planned Mental Health Assessments on Private Premises, and (4) Applying the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

External links

ACPO website

NPIA website

NPIA website: Guidance

  • "Provide[s] an opportunity for the police to engage in a meaningful dialogue with other agencies operating in the field of mental health and criminal justice, including the Department of Health (particularly Offender Health) and the Welsh Assembly Government
  • "When used in conjunction with generic and specialist training and the process of assisted implementation for police forces, the guidance should provide a robust mechanism for the development and improvement of police responses in the field of mental health, and the continuation of discussion and decision making in this area
  • "Provides an overview of the subject, including some of the myths and challenges surrounding this area of police business
  • "Pease see the four briefing notes that have been produced to support this guidance."

NPIA website: Briefing notes

  • Briefing Note on Applying the Mental Capacity Act 2005 - May 2010 - "The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 gives a legal basis for providing care and treatment for people aged 16 years and over who lack the mental capacity to give their consent to such care and treatment. The Act protects decision makers where they take reasonable steps to assess someone's capacity and then act in the reasonable belief that the person lacks capacity and that such action is in their best interests. This briefing note will help police officers and staff when in a circumstance to have to make those decisions."